Bees for the Horticulturist PDF ePub eBook

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Bees for the Horticulturist free pdf Excerpt from Bees for the Horticulturist: Bulletin of the Kansas State Horticultural Society, June, 1922 [Dr. J. H. Merrill, assistant professor of entomology at Kansas State Agricultural College, Manhattan, who is also state apiarist, has prepared the following papers, which are of much interest to those who keep bees.] Races Of Bees In Kansas. There are several races of bees found in Kansas. They are principally the Black or German bees, Caucasians, Carniolans, Italians, Goldens, and last but not least, the hybrids. Each one of these different races has individual characteristics, some good and some bad. With some of the races the bad points overbalance the good, thus making that race unsuitable for honey production in our state. The Black (or German) bee has probably been in this country longer than any of the other races. It is commonly spoken of as the native bee, although this is not true, as honeybees are not natives of this country. They were introduced into New England in 1638, and on account of their long stay here have come to be known as native bees. In spite of having been here for so long, they are not particularly well adapted to this country. They are less prolific than the Italian bees, are very cross, build a great many queen cells, and therefore swarm often. They are not very good at cleaning their hives or resisting moths. They are not resistant to European foul brood, which is one of the worst brood diseases of bees. They are very excitable, and run wildly about on the combs when the hive is opened. This, together with the fact that the queen is not marked differently from the workers, makes it very difficult to locate her on the frame. Their good points, however, are that they cap their honey white, making a very fine-looking product, and are said to stand the winter well. The fact that they have been here since 1638 would seem to bear out this point. The Caucasian bee varies in color, but closely resembles the black bee. It is said that some of them show yellow bands on the abdomen somewhat similar to the Italians, but most of them are dark gray with a metallic blue cast in the drones. This race of bees has a great many good points. They have not been in this country very long and have not been tested as thoroughly as the black bees. They were introduced into New York in the year 1880. They are the gentlest race of bees known. They cap their honey white, are good workers, defend their hives well against robbers, winter well, and, generally speaking, are very desirable bees. The disadvantage of this race of bees is that they use an abundance of propolis in their hives, sometimes almost closing entire entrances. In addition to their habit of propojizing the hive, they use burr and brace combs lavishly. As they closely resemble the black bees in color, it is very hard to tell when they are purely mated, and hvbrids from this race are not as gentle as the pure bees. A great many beekeepers are loud in their praise of the Caucasian race, and it may come to find a more prominent place than it now occupies. The Carniolans, like the Caucasians, are very gentle bees- and like them also, they have not been tested here long enough for us to know just how valuable they are. These bees are dark colored, and when seen in a group appear to have a bluish color. However, when examined closely this bluish color is accounted for by the fact that the wings are iridescent. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com

About O F Whitney

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Details Book

Author : O F Whitney
Publisher : Forgotten Books
Data Published : 27 September 2015
ISBN : 1332223206
EAN : 9781332223206
Format Book : PDF, Epub, DOCx, TXT
Number of Pages : 28 pages
Age + : 15 years
Language : English
Rating :

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  • Bees for the Horticulturist free pdfBees for the Horticulturist

    . Excerpt from Bees for the Horticulturist: Bulletin of the Kansas State Horticultural Society, June, 1922 [Dr. J. H. Merrill, assistant professor of entomology at Kansas State Agricultural College, M