The Subject in Art PDF ePub eBook

Books Info:

The Subject in Art free pdf Challenging prevailing theories regarding the birth of the subject, Catherine M. Soussloff argues that the modern subject did not emerge from psychoanalysis or existential philosophy but rather in the theory and practice of portraiture in early-twentieth-century Vienna. Soussloff traces the development in Vienna of an ethics of representation that emphasized subjects as socially and historically constructed selves who could only be understood-and understand themselves-in relation to others, including the portrait painters and the viewers. In this beautifully illustrated book, she demonstrates both how portrait painters began to focus on the interior lives of their subjects and how the discipline of art history developed around the genre of portraiture. Soussloff combines a historically grounded examination of art and art historical thinking in Vienna with subsequent theories of portraiture and a careful historiography of philosophical and psychoanalytic approaches to human consciousness from Hegel to Sartre and from Freud to Lacan. She chronicles the emergence of a social theory of art among the art historians of the Vienna School, demonstrates how the Expressionist painter Oskar Kokoschka depicted the Jewish subject, and explores the development of pictorialist photography. Reflecting on the implications of the visualized, modern subject for textual and linguistic analyses of subjectivity, Soussloff concludes that the Viennese art historians, photographers, and painters will henceforth have to be recognized as precursors to such better-known theorists of the subject as Sartre, Foucault, and Lacan.

About Catherine M. Soussloff

Catherine M. Soussloff holds the University of California Presidential Chair in the History of Art and Visual Culture at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is the author of The Absolute Artist: The Historiography of a Concept and the editor of Jewish Identity in Modern Art History.

Details Book

Author : Catherine M. Soussloff
Publisher : Duke University Press
Data Published : 04 October 2006
ISBN : 0822336588
EAN : 9780822336587
Format Book : PDF, Epub, DOCx, TXT
Number of Pages : 192 pages
Age + : 15 years
Language : English
Rating :

Reviews The Subject in Art



17 Comments Add a comment




Related eBooks Download


  • Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity in Modern Philosophy and Psychoanalysis free pdfSubjectivity and Intersubjectivity in Modern Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

    This study of subjectivity and intersubjectivity develops an account of conceptions of the subject in philosophy and psychoanalytic theory. It examines the relationship between the theories of subjectivity..


  • Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity in Modern Philosophy and Psychoanalysis free pdfSubjectivity and Intersubjectivity in Modern Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

    This study of subjectivity and intersubjectivity develops an account of conceptions of the subject in philosophy and psychoanalytic theory. It examines the relationship between the theories of subjectivity..


  • Mortal Subjects free pdfMortal Subjects

    This wide ranging and challenging book explores the relationship between subjectivity and mortality as it is understood by a number of twentieth-century French philosophers including Sartre. Lacan..


  • Distortion and Love free pdfDistortion and Love

    In this ground-breaking book. a theory of `distortion' - of the way in which the processes of human life are subject to interference. diversion and transformation - is developed by way of the art of one of Britain's greatest twentieth-century painters and that art's public reception..


  • Lacan: In Spite of Everything free pdfLacan: In Spite of Everything

    Jacques Lacan continues to be subject to the most extravagant interpretations. some of them idolizing. some demonizing. To recall Lacan's career. now the heroic age of psychoanalysis is over..


  • The Subject in Art free pdfThe Subject in Art

    Where To Download Free Books Online. Challenging prevailing theories regarding the birth of the subject, Catherine M. Soussloff argues that the modern subject did not emerge from psychoanalysis or exi